Pushing Boundaries.
msnbc:


"From 2006 to 2012, a white police officer killed a black person at least twice a week in this country." - MHP

Melissa Harris-Perry gives a heart-wrenching tribute to the deaths of black men that have occurred at the hands of police in the past decade.

msnbc:

"From 2006 to 2012, a white police officer killed a black person at least twice a week in this country." - MHP

Melissa Harris-Perry gives a heart-wrenching tribute to the deaths of black men that have occurred at the hands of police in the past decade.

"I had always believed that I could do anything, and when you’re in school you can do anything. You can play any role, you can play any age, because that’s what you do at school. But the realization that they really didn’t make movies or TV shows about black women… I suddenly panicked. I just had this panic like ‘Oh my god, I spent all this time to do this thing that the industry is not set up for me to succeed in this thing.’ So I freaked out. I freaked out." - Tracie Thoms: Life After Juilliard

jessehimself:

So, I went to Ferguson for a few days and agreed to share my observations with this outlet. They ran this piece:
Nowhere in the conversation did I “blast” police. I am not the…

dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.

Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.

Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.

With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.

As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.

"She removes her wig, her eyelashes, her makeup, never breaking eye contact with the reflection of her natural self. It’s an intimate, powerful moment television doesn’t often show: A black woman removing all the elements white supremacy tells her she has to wear to be beautiful, successful, powerful." (x)

hellogiggles:

Hehe :) She’s got it! 

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Ferguson Panel at the Missouri History Museum

Part Four

Wednesday, October 15th

ABSOLUTE BEST PART OF THE INCREDIBLES.